Interviews with Newly Appointed ILOL Fellows

Interview with:

  • Professor MUDr.Karel Pacak, DrSc. ILOL Fellow in health care

Chief, Section on Medical Neuroendocrinology, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, USA

Research Topics: Neuroendocrine Tumors and Endocrine Oncology, Functional Imaging

1. What trends do you expect in your professional area in the coming three years?

In the next three years I expect changes in new therapeutic options for tumors based on new functional imaging approaches. New functional imaging approaches will detect the degree of hypoxia, apoptosis, angiogenesis, proliferation as well as tumor-specific markers. This will open a new therapy called “individualized medicine” and will efficiently target tumors by reducing cost and use of many ineffective drugs that cause serious side effects.

2. What do you consider the worst threat of the future development in your profession?

I see the worst threat as having a “gap” between newly gained scientific knowledge and its application into clinical practice in my profession. Even at present, clinicians are not able to apply more than 10% of new scientific knowledge available to them simply due to work load, complexity of patients and the lack of proper education in new clinical fields (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics, ethical issues sharing health related patients’ problem with 3rd parties).

3. What does desired quality of life mean for you – now and in ten years?

Desired quality of life is related to a so-called psychological wellness. Depression, anxiety, and nervousness derived from the inability to manage workload and multitask will significantly influence how we function, behave and obtain a sense well-being. If there is no change in attitudes and accesses towards work and evaluation of employees in the nearest future, the majority of people will take drugs and depression will be the number one illness.

 

  • Carlos Valiente, Ph.D. ILOL Fellow in health care

1. What trends do you expect in your professional area in the coming three years?

During the next three years I expect scholars to increasingly focus on the dynamic interplay between neural or physiological systems and environmental conditions when predicting key developmental outcomes. I further expect that family scholars will be motivated to pursue research agendas that are funded by organizations that have not traditionally played a significant role in shaping developmental science.

2. What do you consider the worst threat of the future development in your profession?

One of the most significant threats is the difficulty of disseminating scientific knowledge in ways that positively impact public life. The devaluation of scientific gains can undermine public support for future investments, particularly given policy makers’ needs to balance significant financial pressures from multiple constituents.

3. What does desired quality of life mean for you – now and in ten years?

There are individual differences in how one achieves and maintains a quality life. To me, a desired quality of life stems from an observance of basic human rights that allow individuals and families to balance working to meet their physical needs as well as the emotional and relational needs of the family members. Most precisely, fulfilling the purposes for my life is the best way to achieve a quality life. While the precise nature of these elements change over time, I do not think the fundamental premise changes.

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